Living the Resurrection by Eugene H. Peterson

Eugene H. Peterson, Living the Resurrection: The Risen Christ in Everyday Life (Colorado Springs, USA: NavPress), 2006.

The resurrection of Jesus is one of the central foundations which give the Christian hope and assurance in life. In this little volume Peterson tries to explain what living the resurrection is, how to go about it and strategies to cultivate it in everyday life. There is a threefold aim to the book (pg. 14):

What i want to do is recover our resurrection center and embrace the formation traditions that develop out of it. I’m going to deal in turn with threes aspects of Jesus’ resurrection that define and energise us as we enter the practice of resurrection lives. I will then set this resurrection life lived out of reality and conditions of Jesus’ resurrection in contrast to what i consider the common cultura habits about assumptions that are either oblivious to or make detours around resurrection. I will name this “the deconstruction of resurrection”. Finally, i will suggest something of what is involved in cultivating the practice of resurrection: living appropriately and responsively in a world in which Christ is risen.

With this beginning Peterson sets out on his task and by the end of the book i don’t think he got there. In many instances the book is rather confusing and talks in generalities and broad terms about life and “living the resurrection”. While the book may try to define what “living the resurrection” is I myself didn’t find the answer or found it awfully odd. What i got out of it was that “living the resurrection” involved keeping a Sabbath, witnessing, getting baptised and having meals with friends. In the final chapter i sensed that the summary of “living the resurrection” was simply to live a life that isn’t over-run by busyness.

The book left me confused as to what actually “living the resurrection” is. I don’t think it achieved its aims, however, if it did then it wasn’t clear enough for me. It does have some good things to say about those four or five topics mentioned above but for what it says its going to do i don’t think it does.

2/5.

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from NavPress Publishers as part of their Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commision’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

Advertisements

Jesus Manifesto by Leonard Sweet & Frank Viola

This book is an excellent book. In ten chapters Sweet and Viola give ample evidence in the promotion of Christ, his supremacy and sovereignty. Throughout each and every page there is continual recognition of Jesus and who he is. There is regular reference back to the Bible and seeing how God has been at work throughout history. The authors analyse the current church and it’s “Youniverse” centredness, speaking directly to the heart of the church and her attendees. It is a challenge to the hearts of the readers of this book as it speaks so much truth. The essence of much of the book and it’s aims can be seen in this quote on pg. 100:

“Our problem is this: we have created a narcissistic form of Christianity in which “conversion” is less turning toward Christ than a turning toward success or fame or fortunes. Narcissus never had it so good than in best-seller Christianity, which has become self-centredness wrapping up as ‘spirituality’, which has become the latest fashion accessory for the person who has everything…True “conversion” is to lay hold of Christ, or rather, as Paul corrected himself, to allow Christ to lay hold of us…You are not the point. And we are not the point. Jesus Christ always has been and always will be the point. All the arrows point to Him and not to us”

The theological and scriptural basis on many of their arguments are well-founded. There is a great chapter describing Bethany as the resting place for the Lord while on earth and the truth that comes from those passages in Luke. There is a constant looking at Christ and the Word and then reflecting on that for our day today. In many respects this book is harping on about exactly what John Piper has been harping on about for many years now, just from a different angle and a bit lighter.

The aim of the book is to capture the hearts of those within the church and present a vision of Christ that promotes Him as the “one thing” and the root of Christianity. I think it is an excellent book and well worth spending the time to read. It is an easy read with many illustrations to keep one engaged. You’ll want to re-evaluate your walk with Christ once you’ve read it.

4/5.

I Love My Church

I love my church.

I love that Jesus is glorified at my church.

I love that the Bible is taught at my church.

I love that people are hungry to know more of God at my church.

I love that people are willing to learn the Bible at my church.

I love that there is a growing community of young people at my church.

I love that visitors feel welcome enough to come out to snac at my church.

I love that during the week there are different people from my church meeting together for funsies.

I love that those who come are willing to serve at my church.

I love that there is a sense of the Spirit and of community at my church.

I love that young adults are willing to invest in young people at my church.

I love that there are a number of ‘older folk’ who support the evening congregation at my church.

I love that encouragement can be gleaned from just being with people and hearing their stories at my church.

I love that I have the opportunity to lead people at my church.

I love my church.

I love that it’s God’s church.

A House United by Frank Frangipane

Frank Frangipane, House United: How Christ-Centered Unity Can End Church Division (Grand Rapids, USA: Chosen Books), 2006.

I was given this book by a long-time serving member of my church. It was given to me on the back of a pastor leaving and also their interest in my article in the Baptist Witness. I was greatly encouraged to receive this and have spent a few weeks reading through it.

The central premise of Frangipane’s book is much like his title. He is encouraging believers the world over to quit being so divisive and start taking heed to the Bible’s commands for unity.

The book is in five parts and he comes out strong by talking about the sin of division straight up. I seemed to plough through the beginning of the book and it wasn’t until the last few sections where he captivated me a bit more. I don’t think he was particularly wrong in the beginning of his book but it just took a while to get into. He touches on important topics throughout and uses the Bible correctly in making his points – although he does tend to work interesting angles into his OT exegesis. I wasn’t convinced too much with his chapters on Lucifer and demons but he does hit many nails right on their heads in other parts.

As the book flows he works from stating the sinful nature of church splits and division to looking at areas where division usually starts. The third part that he touches upon is the way in which healing can come about after certain sins and divisions within a church and then encourages all believers to become more Christlike in their hearts.

I think that it is a great book and was quite thought-provoking. He is solidly evangelical and Biblically based and it is hard to argue against what he says. I would recommend this book to anyone who has gone through a church split or division, has felt hurt by the church or who wonders why the church isn’t united and how to bring healing to at least a little part of it.

4/5.

Productivity and The Bible

Recently I’ve been quite enamoured with a few organisational/productivity type blogs. They are the kind of blogs which promote and give insight into being more productive and organised.

I have found many of their articles and suggestions really helpful.

For example there was one particular article which promotes getting your email in-box down to zero each day. Since reading that article I have been quite efficient with my emails and would say that the time spent reading the article has been rather advantageous to my life. However, sometimes it takes a while to find that gold nugget of advice or instruction. Sometimes it could mean trawling through 50-100 different posts before something really strikes you and you feel that you can apply it to your lifestyle and that it will make a positive contribution to your life.

I’m glad the Bible isn’t like that. In 1 Timothy 3:16-17 we are told that all Scripture is God breathed and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction and for training in righteousness. This is in order to make a person of God competent and equipped for every good work. Therefore, whenever I open the Scriptures and read what God says I can be confident that I am not wasting my time trawling through to find something that’s relevant – it all is!

If only I spent less time reading blogs and more time in His Word!

I wonder then, is the Bible a productivity tool?

Equipped for Adventure by Scott Kirby

equippedforadventureScott Kirby, Equipped for Adventure: A practical guide to short-term mission trips (186 pages, Birmingham, USA: New Hope Publishers), 2006.

Short-term mission trips are interesting things. Everyone in ministry seems to have an opinion, particularly those within the ‘mission’ community. This is yet another book promoting the use of short-term mission trips but also tells you how to run one. As its title suggests, it is full of practical ideas and helps in order to run a short-term trip successfully.

The book is OK. It has some really good tips regarding the preparation, organisation and debrief stages, but that’s about as good as Kirby gets (which is good, don’t get me wrong).

His main premise of doing short-term mission, stated in the first chapter, could use some work. While he does link it in with a casual reference to the Great Commission (Matt 28:19-20) he seems to focus more on it being an adventure. The impression from those opening pages wasn’t particularly high.

After only recently returning from leading a team myself I do think the practical tips given by Kirby are good. The overall sense of the book is certainly American (which isn’t necessarily a bad thing) which does need to be recognised and adapted for other countries/cultures. I think you would call this an entry-level STM trip book, other resources around this, depending on where one is going, would be beneficial.

2.5/5

Love & Respect by Emerson Eggerichs

loveandrespectEmerson Eggerichs, Love & Respect: The love she most desires, the respect he desperately needs (303 pages, Nashville, USA: Thomas Nelson), 2004.

Within the first three chapters Dr. Emerson Eggerichs will captivate your attention. It is within these early pages of his book that he describes the main premise of his book. That being, based on Ephesians 5:33, husbands are to unconditionally love their wives and wives to unconditionally respect their husbands. It is within this context that Eggerichs explains how he has developed theoretical and practical solutions surrounding communication and relationship problems within a relationship/marriage.

The book is based on Scriptural principles, particularly this one passage from Ephesians. It would be highly recommended for married couples, engaged couples or anyone in a relationship. Eggerichs’ gives illustrations from his ministry both in the pastorate and counselling as well as letting us in on how others have reacted to his teaching. Eggerichs’  focuses a lot of his attention on communication and the way both the man and woman’s brain works and comprehends things. It gives a good insight into the opposite sex which will helpfully explain a lot of things!

It seems that from the turn of the millennium he has been teaching this love & respect at various conferences and the like and this book is the summary of that teaching. It is a good book and I will be recommending it to friends and also my wife.

3/5.

Trolls & Truth by Jimmy Dorrell

trolls-and-truthJimmy Dorrell, Trolls & Truth: 14 realities about today’s church that we don’t want to see (215 pages, Birmingham, USA: New Hope Publishers), 2006.

Jimmy Dorrell has been a church pastor with a difference. He and his wife moved to Texas in the late seventies and began a church under a bridge, correct, under a bridge. He and his wife have ministered to numerous homeless and less-fortunate people over many years and so this book is mostly about his story and ministry with challenging thoughts regarding church.

Each chapter of the book begins with a real life illustration of a person or persons who has been involved in his Dorrell’s church. He then uses this story as a launching pad into talking about the way the church “does church”, particularly to those who are homeless or disabled, struggling with mental illness or certain addictions.

Dorrell gives an interesting insight into his church and ministry. It is interesting to read of the ways in which he and others within his church have reached out to those struggling with these issues. It is good to see that he goes back to the Bible in terms of making his points. However, I do find he seems to take some passages out of context or reads into them things that are not there. It is certainly a book that makes one think about how to reach people who are not normally involved in a church (particularly in the society where I live) but I think a little more balance regarding the Gospel and how that works alongside helping the needy.

Overall I thought the book was OK, I wasn’t particularly enamoured about it because it seemed to lack the theological backing and Gospel focus. But, still thought provoking.

2.5/5

Book Review: What is a Healthy Church?

healthy-church-214x300Mark Dever, What is a Healthy Church? (126 pages, Wheaton, USA: Crossway), 2007.

Mark Dever is a big proponent for the local church. Previously he has written a number of books about the local church and what is important about it. This one is no different and is essentially a more concise version of one of his previous books, Nine Marks of a Healthy Church.

While only a short volume Dever packs a number of important topics within. In part 1 he details what a healthy church is, then goes on to talk of the three essential marks of a healthy church (expository preaching, Biblical theology and a Biblical understanding of the Gospel) in part 2. Part 3 is made up of six important marks of a healthy church, that being a Biblical understanding of conversion, evangelism and membership while also talking about church discipline, discipleship and leadership.

It is a very good book and one that certainly gets you thinking about a theology of the local church. I particularly like the way in which he has thought through the different and more important elements of the local church. What else is good is that he doesn’t give a model of ministry or different ideas of how church should be run but rather is giving large Biblical concepts as an over-arching guide to ones ministry philosophy. While he does talk about eldership, he doesn’t go into how one should order a service, what kind of music, how to make the place acceptable to ‘outsiders’ or visitors. What he does do is push for a church that is Biblically-centred, that is in the world but not of the world. 8/10.

A Million Miles in a Thousand Years by Donald Miller

A Million Miles in a Thousand Years_Donald MillerDonald Miller, A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: What I learned while editing my life (250 pages, Nashville, USA: Thomas Nelson), 2009.

I have to admit that i was rather sceptical about this book when i first received it. Donald Miller is known as an ’emergent guy’ and that somewhat put me off immediately. I know, it speaks particularly bad of me, but hey, that’s just the way i felt – i’ve asked for forgiveness.

With that said, i didn’t really know what to expect of this book. Coming from a Christian publisher and somewhat hinting at a biography of sorts i suppose i was thinking this would be a journey through Don’s life. And that is what it was, a journey through Don’s “Story” as he put it, but in a very unusual but yet captivating way.

The book is a story of his life over a particular period in his life which spans about a year or two. That i think is the gist of book. I have to admit that i am still a little uncertain as to what the point of his book is, if it is just to tell a story then he has achieved that. However, if he has wanted to purvey some sort of point regarding God, Jesus and the Christian life then he has left a little to be desired.

Toward the beginning of the book (the first 50 pages or so) the implication of what he says is that one should always be looking out for a better ‘story’, choosing to make a better ‘story’. That use of the word ‘story’ simply meant adventure to me. The illustrations that Don used were adventurous and the choices that he and his friends seemed to make were more adventurous ones than other ‘options’ (read: life choices) available at the time.

The way Don writes is attractive, he sucked me in to his “story”. I must commend him for that. The way in which he told illustrations from his life and the way in which he moved ones emotions up and down kept me wanting to keep going. He is a brilliant writer and storyteller and many of his experiences seem like great experiences to have.

However, i do have a few problems with the book:

First, to me it was a book without a point, as i’ve said previously. It was a good book, but just so fluid that i couldn’t work out what he was trying to say to me as the reader. When looking at the short reviews by big names in Christian circles like Rob Bell, Max Lucado etc. i had the impression that it was going to be a really life-shattering and “disturbing” (Rob Bell) book. Unfortunately this wasn’t the case. I was 50 pages in and didn’t know where he was going, what he wanted me to take away from it etc. and this continued until the very last page.

Second, choosing a better “story” implied that one should take more risk and be more adventurous in the choices we make from day-to-day. I thought this could lead down a path which could actually be destructive to some people rather than bringing them life changing transformation. I wondered why we wouldn’t make choices more in-line with what Christ would want rather than a bigger and better ‘experience’. That is not to discount that a life with Christ is not adventurous by any stretch of the imagination, however, if our choices are simply based on what we think is more adventurous then we may indeed not be doing what God wants us to. It just seemed a little selfish to me with no consideration for what the Spirit may be saying to us and how God may want to use us.

I would still come to the conclusion that it is an OK book. It is an easy read and as i said, written really well. I would recommend it to people if they’d like something of a moving ‘story’. Overall, 6/10.